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Steven Dow And His Team Tackle Innovation In Crowdsourcing

Steven Dow And His Team Tackle Innovation In Crowdsourcing

Steven Dow And His Team Tackle Innovation In Crowdsourcing

As part of the Design Lab’s graduate course work on Crowdsourcing taught by Steven Dow, students explored models —such as paid micro-work, citizen science, crisis informatics, and games with a purpose— to bring large groups of people together to make something greater than any one person could achieve. For their final presentations, students innovated some wonderfully creative research projects: contributing novel methods, inventing new crowd technologies, and answering open questions about crowdsourcing.

Here are some of the projects Steven Dow and his team of students worked on:
  • Self-forming crowd teams: how micro-workers choose teammates (Markus Duecker, Andrew Dennis)
  • How to SOAR with crowds: strategic reading with crowdsourced lit reviews (Amy Rae Fox, Kandarp Khandwala, Tricia Ngoon)

  • Improving the livestream experience of Multiplayer Online Battle Arena events through “audience-sourcing” (Rahul Ramath)
  • Can soft skills be mined from Github? Expert and crowd analysis of open source software project conversations (Ariel Weingarten)

  • Preference matching in recommendation tasks using crowd clustering (Shawn Hyeonsu Kang)
  • Learning the secret of social charm in a game: You rate, we decode (Amanda Song, Shuai Tang, Mohammad Motiei)
  • Cream of the Crop: Recruiting expert crowd workers to disseminate their strategies to subsequent workers (Abhinav Mishra, Agneev Ghosh, Mansi Malik)

ABOUT STEVEN DOW:

Steven is an Assistant Professor of Cognitive Science at UC San Diego where he researches human-computer interaction, social computing, and creativity. Steven received the National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 2015 for research on “advancing collective innovation.” He was co-PI on three other National Science Foundation grants, a Google Faculty Grant, Stanford’s Postdoctoral Research Award, and the Hasso Plattner Design Thinking Research Grant. Steven was on the faculty in the HCI Institute at CMU from 2011-2015. He holds an MS and PhD in Human-Centered Computing from the Georgia Institute of Technology, and a BS in Industrial Engineering from University of Iowa.

As part of the Design Lab’s graduate course work on Crowdsourcing taught by Steven Dow, students explored models —such as paid micro-work, citizen science, crisis informatics, and games with a purpose— to bring large groups of people together to make something greater than any one person could achieve. For their final presentations, students innovated some wonderfully creative research projects: contributing novel methods, inventing new crowd technologies, and answering open questions about crowdsourcing.

Here are some of the projects Steven Dow and his team of students worked on:
  • Self-forming crowd teams: how micro-workers choose teammates (Markus Duecker, Andrew Dennis)
  • How to SOAR with crowds: strategic reading with crowdsourced lit reviews (Amy Rae Fox, Kandarp Khandwala, Tricia Ngoon)

  • Improving the livestream experience of Multiplayer Online Battle Arena events through “audience-sourcing” (Rahul Ramath)
  • Can soft skills be mined from Github? Expert and crowd analysis of open source software project conversations (Ariel Weingarten)

  • Preference matching in recommendation tasks using crowd clustering (Shawn Hyeonsu Kang)
  • Learning the secret of social charm in a game: You rate, we decode (Amanda Song, Shuai Tang, Mohammad Motiei)
  • Cream of the Crop: Recruiting expert crowd workers to disseminate their strategies to subsequent workers (Abhinav Mishra, Agneev Ghosh, Mansi Malik)

ABOUT STEVEN DOW:

Steven is an Assistant Professor of Cognitive Science at UC San Diego where he researches human-computer interaction, social computing, and creativity. Steven received the National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 2015 for research on “advancing collective innovation.” He was co-PI on three other National Science Foundation grants, a Google Faculty Grant, Stanford’s Postdoctoral Research Award, and the Hasso Plattner Design Thinking Research Grant. Steven was on the faculty in the HCI Institute at CMU from 2011-2015. He holds an MS and PhD in Human-Centered Computing from the Georgia Institute of Technology, and a BS in Industrial Engineering from University of Iowa.

As part of the Design Lab’s graduate course work on Crowdsourcing taught by Steven Dow, students explored models —such as paid micro-work, citizen science, crisis informatics, and games with a purpose— to bring large groups of people together to make something greater than any one person could achieve. For their final presentations, students innovated some wonderfully creative research projects: contributing novel methods, inventing new crowd technologies, and answering open questions about crowdsourcing.

Here are some of the projects Steven Dow and his team of students worked on:
  • Self-forming crowd teams: how micro-workers choose teammates (Markus Duecker, Andrew Dennis)
  • How to SOAR with crowds: strategic reading with crowdsourced lit reviews (Amy Rae Fox, Kandarp Khandwala, Tricia Ngoon)

  • Improving the livestream experience of Multiplayer Online Battle Arena events through “audience-sourcing” (Rahul Ramath)
  • Can soft skills be mined from Github? Expert and crowd analysis of open source software project conversations (Ariel Weingarten)

  • Preference matching in recommendation tasks using crowd clustering (Shawn Hyeonsu Kang)
  • Learning the secret of social charm in a game: You rate, we decode (Amanda Song, Shuai Tang, Mohammad Motiei)
  • Cream of the Crop: Recruiting expert crowd workers to disseminate their strategies to subsequent workers (Abhinav Mishra, Agneev Ghosh, Mansi Malik)

ABOUT STEVEN DOW:

Steven is an Assistant Professor of Cognitive Science at UC San Diego where he researches human-computer interaction, social computing, and creativity. Steven received the National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 2015 for research on “advancing collective innovation.” He was co-PI on three other National Science Foundation grants, a Google Faculty Grant, Stanford’s Postdoctoral Research Award, and the Hasso Plattner Design Thinking Research Grant. Steven was on the faculty in the HCI Institute at CMU from 2011-2015. He holds an MS and PhD in Human-Centered Computing from the Georgia Institute of Technology, and a BS in Industrial Engineering from University of Iowa.

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