Skip to content

SPUR Team 6

SPUR Team 6

SPUR Team 6

SPUR TEAM 6

This report outlines the journey of a team aiming to improve how undergraduate students identify research opportunities that align with their profiles, focusing on developing their skills and satisfying their needs. Initially, the problem statement targeted matching students’ readiness and majors with research opportunities but evolved to emphasize better navigation of the URH database to match students’ profiles with opportunities holistically.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

How might we help undergraduate students identify research opportunities that match their readiness, align with their majors, and provide a positive experience.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Findings from Empathy and Interviews

  • Emphasize increasing awareness and targeting outreach for databases and opportunities.
  • Interviews with a broad range of stakeholders revealed the database is valued but viewed as STEM-heavy, with issues related to information overload and problematic filtering systems.

Secondary Research Insights

  • Other universities vary in database quality.
  • The Real portal needs more attention, with potential improvements in UI/UX and a suggestion to include tutorials for easier navigation.

Synthesis Matrix Summary

  • Due to varying stakeholder needs and awareness levels, there’s no single approach to engaging with research opportunities.
  • Key issues include limited awareness and available opportunities in the databases for non-STEM and international students.
DEFINE

Key Challenges Identified

  • General: Difficulty knowing where to start, siloed information, and a lack of awareness about research databases.
  • Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: There are challenges in finding formal opportunities and a misconception that research is predominantly STEM-focused.
  • International/Undocumented Students: Limited opportunities due to funding regulations.
  • Staff and Advisors: Lack of comprehensive knowledge about all available opportunities.

Updated Problem Statement 

The team refined the problem statement to focus on enhancing the navigation of the URH database to more effectively match undergraduate students with research opportunities that fit their comprehensive profiles.

How might we help undergraduate students identify research opportunities that match their profile, develop their skills, and satisfy their needs.

Summary and Key Takeaways

Significant Takeaways for Moving Forward with SPUR:

  • Macro-level: Addressing the overarching issue of awareness and communication to make the research opportunity search process more centralized and intuitive.
  • Micro-level (URH Specific): Focus on making the database more accessible to first-time users by reducing entry barriers, simplifying navigation, and decluttering information to avoid overwhelming users.

The team concluded that both macro and micro-level changes are crucial to making research opportunities more accessible and navigable for undergraduate students across all disciplines, thereby enhancing their academic and professional development.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further the understanding of a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Marie Sheneman, Phd., McNair Program Assistant Coordinator | RSRI Program Coordinator
  • Tod Oliviere, Director, Student Employment & Career Development
  • Megha Kumar, Student, Data Science/Math-CS
  • Nicole Gong, Student, Cognitive Science (Design/Interdisciplinary Science)
  • Natalie Chiang, Student, Neurobiology & Cognitive Science
  • Sabrina Cheng, Student, Interdisciplinary Science, Comp/Arts, Junior Designer Program
Team 6 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

SPUR TEAM 6

This report outlines the journey of a team aiming to improve how undergraduate students identify research opportunities that align with their profiles, focusing on developing their skills and satisfying their needs. Initially, the problem statement targeted matching students’ readiness and majors with research opportunities but evolved to emphasize better navigation of the URH database to match students’ profiles with opportunities holistically.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

How might we help undergraduate students identify research opportunities that match their readiness, align with their majors, and provide a positive experience.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Findings from Empathy and Interviews

  • Emphasize increasing awareness and targeting outreach for databases and opportunities.
  • Interviews with a broad range of stakeholders revealed the database is valued but viewed as STEM-heavy, with issues related to information overload and problematic filtering systems.

Secondary Research Insights

  • Other universities vary in database quality.
  • The Real portal needs more attention, with potential improvements in UI/UX and a suggestion to include tutorials for easier navigation.

Synthesis Matrix Summary

  • Due to varying stakeholder needs and awareness levels, there’s no single approach to engaging with research opportunities.
  • Key issues include limited awareness and available opportunities in the databases for non-STEM and international students.
DEFINE

Key Challenges Identified

  • General: Difficulty knowing where to start, siloed information, and a lack of awareness about research databases.
  • Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: There are challenges in finding formal opportunities and a misconception that research is predominantly STEM-focused.
  • International/Undocumented Students: Limited opportunities due to funding regulations.
  • Staff and Advisors: Lack of comprehensive knowledge about all available opportunities.

Updated Problem Statement 

The team refined the problem statement to focus on enhancing the navigation of the URH database to more effectively match undergraduate students with research opportunities that fit their comprehensive profiles.

How might we help undergraduate students identify research opportunities that match their profile, develop their skills, and satisfy their needs.

Summary and Key Takeaways

Significant Takeaways for Moving Forward with SPUR:

  • Macro-level: Addressing the overarching issue of awareness and communication to make the research opportunity search process more centralized and intuitive.
  • Micro-level (URH Specific): Focus on making the database more accessible to first-time users by reducing entry barriers, simplifying navigation, and decluttering information to avoid overwhelming users.

The team concluded that both macro and micro-level changes are crucial to making research opportunities more accessible and navigable for undergraduate students across all disciplines, thereby enhancing their academic and professional development.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further the understanding of a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Marie Sheneman, Phd., McNair Program Assistant Coordinator | RSRI Program Coordinator
  • Tod Oliviere, Director, Student Employment & Career Development
  • Megha Kumar, Student, Data Science/Math-CS
  • Nicole Gong, Student, Cognitive Science (Design/Interdisciplinary Science)
  • Natalie Chiang, Student, Neurobiology & Cognitive Science
  • Sabrina Cheng, Student, Interdisciplinary Science, Comp/Arts, Junior Designer Program
Team 6 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

SPUR TEAM 6

This report outlines the journey of a team aiming to improve how undergraduate students identify research opportunities that align with their profiles, focusing on developing their skills and satisfying their needs. Initially, the problem statement targeted matching students’ readiness and majors with research opportunities but evolved to emphasize better navigation of the URH database to match students’ profiles with opportunities holistically.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

How might we help undergraduate students identify research opportunities that match their readiness, align with their majors, and provide a positive experience.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Findings from Empathy and Interviews

  • Emphasize increasing awareness and targeting outreach for databases and opportunities.
  • Interviews with a broad range of stakeholders revealed the database is valued but viewed as STEM-heavy, with issues related to information overload and problematic filtering systems.

Secondary Research Insights

  • Other universities vary in database quality.
  • The Real portal needs more attention, with potential improvements in UI/UX and a suggestion to include tutorials for easier navigation.

Synthesis Matrix Summary

  • Due to varying stakeholder needs and awareness levels, there’s no single approach to engaging with research opportunities.
  • Key issues include limited awareness and available opportunities in the databases for non-STEM and international students.
DEFINE

Key Challenges Identified

  • General: Difficulty knowing where to start, siloed information, and a lack of awareness about research databases.
  • Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: There are challenges in finding formal opportunities and a misconception that research is predominantly STEM-focused.
  • International/Undocumented Students: Limited opportunities due to funding regulations.
  • Staff and Advisors: Lack of comprehensive knowledge about all available opportunities.

Updated Problem Statement 

The team refined the problem statement to focus on enhancing the navigation of the URH database to more effectively match undergraduate students with research opportunities that fit their comprehensive profiles.

How might we help undergraduate students identify research opportunities that match their profile, develop their skills, and satisfy their needs.

Summary and Key Takeaways

Significant Takeaways for Moving Forward with SPUR:

  • Macro-level: Addressing the overarching issue of awareness and communication to make the research opportunity search process more centralized and intuitive.
  • Micro-level (URH Specific): Focus on making the database more accessible to first-time users by reducing entry barriers, simplifying navigation, and decluttering information to avoid overwhelming users.

The team concluded that both macro and micro-level changes are crucial to making research opportunities more accessible and navigable for undergraduate students across all disciplines, thereby enhancing their academic and professional development.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further the understanding of a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Marie Sheneman, Phd., McNair Program Assistant Coordinator | RSRI Program Coordinator
  • Tod Oliviere, Director, Student Employment & Career Development
  • Megha Kumar, Student, Data Science/Math-CS
  • Nicole Gong, Student, Cognitive Science (Design/Interdisciplinary Science)
  • Natalie Chiang, Student, Neurobiology & Cognitive Science
  • Sabrina Cheng, Student, Interdisciplinary Science, Comp/Arts, Junior Designer Program
Team 6 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

Read Next

Design Lab Heads Downtown to Present New Strategies and Program to Take on Society’s Most Daunting Challenges

Last week, UC San Diego Design Lab Assistant Professor of Cognitive Science Steven Dow and…

Announcing The New Graduate Student Specialization In Human-centered Design

Announcing the new Graduate Student Specialization in Human-centered Design

Image courtesy of Adobe Stock

Announcing the new Graduate Student Specialization in Human-centered Design in partnership with the UC San Diego Design Lab, Cognitive Science (CogSci), Computer Science and Engineering (CSE), and Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science (HWSPH).

The Design Graduate Specialization is a set of courses graduate students can choose to take that fit into their home degree program requirements. It is analogous to receiving a minor, but at the graduate level. The courses fit into their home program as either electives or as courses that were already part of their core requirements, plus the option to take courses from other programs taking part in the specialization outside of their home program. In addition, students will be required to take at least one course that explicitly addresses and discusses issues of power, privilege, and ethical responses. The Design Graduate Specialization is created so that it can be integrated into a one or two-year Master program or a Ph.D. program.

Design Lab Students Swarm CHI Conference in Denver

In May, many UC San Diego Design Lab members and students swarmed the largest human-computer interaction conference in the world, ACM CHI 2017. Affiliated with ACM SIGCHI, the premier international society for professionals, academics and students who are interested in human-technology and human-computer interaction (HCI), the conference brings together people from multiple disciplines and cultures to explore new ways to practice, develop and improve methods and systems in HCI.

“I love the mix of people at CHI—chatting with people making new sensor technologies, new theoretical approaches, new architectural construction techniques -- it has incredible diversity but is still brought together with a common set of ideas and expectations,” said former Design Lab Fellow Derek Lomas, who presented at the conference.

This year, the mega-HCI conference, which was sponsored by tech-industry giants such as Facebook, Google, IBM, Microsoft and Yahoo! was held in Denver near the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. Organizers selected the site, which is full of scenic trees, mountains and valleys to serve as a motivation for the theme of “Motivate, Innovate, Inspire.”

Unlocking Your Potential: The Benefits of Paid Learning Opportunities at UC San Diego Design Lab

Paid learning opportunities can provide many benefits, from deepening your understanding of the subject matter to offering insights into potential career paths and providing the revenue needed to fund your college experience.

Design-A-Thon: Mindshifts on Megafires

During fire season, it has become the norm to see front-page images of apocalyptic wildfires. A century of suppressing wildfires has created a dangerous accumulation of flammable vegetation on landscapes, contributing to megafires that risk human life and property and destroy ecosystems.

The Design-A-Thon brings together UC San Diego students from all disciplines and experience levels in a pitch-style competition to apply the Design Thinking process to proactive solutions to end destructive wildfires. All participants will be invited to present their submissions on April 20 after the Design@Large panel on Climate Risk Reduction and Technology.

Key dates and events:
-April 7 @ 4 PM - Design Challenge unveiled at kickoff
-April 15 - Registration & design-thinking workshop, lightning talks, and mentor sessions
-April 16 @ 11:59 PM - Submissions due
-April 20 @ 5 PM - Project showcase at Design@Large

SPUR Team 8

The presentation by Team 8 focused on developing pathways to undergraduate research, aiming to alleviate…

Back To Top