Skip to content

SPUR Team 4

SPUR Team 4

SPUR Team 4

SPUR TEAM 4

In an era where undergraduate research experience is increasingly recognized as pivotal for academic and professional success, a team embarked on a comprehensive project to devise strategies that could enhance this journey for students. Their initiative addressed undergraduates’ core challenges in accessing and engaging with research opportunities, aiming to demystify the research process, reduce associated anxieties, and foster a more profound interest in scholarly inquiry.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

Initially, the team articulated the problem: “How might we help undergraduate students better understand research in a way that decreases anxiety, increases interest, and improves research readiness?” This statement underscored the multifaceted barriers students encounter, from the complexity of research to emotional responses and the need for practical engagement.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Through empathy maps, stakeholder mappings, and observations, the team identified key issues affecting undergraduates, including the daunting nature of the research environment, limited accessibility to meaningful opportunities, and the prevalent sense of being overwhelmed and undervalued. 

  • Undergraduate Students: Diverse challenges in accessing research opportunities due to varied backgrounds (STEM, Non-STEM, First-Gen, etc.). Need awareness and resources tailored to their specific needs.
  • Graduate Students: Similar to undergraduates but with a focus on research for career advancement. Act as potential mentors for undergrads.
  • Faculty & Staff: Critical in guiding and informing students about research opportunities, providing mentorship and support across different disciplines.
  • Administrators (Chancellors, Deans, etc.): Strategic role in resource allocation and policy-making to enhance research accessibility.
  • Researchers & Employers (Academic, Corporate, etc.): Offer direct research opportunities but may need to improve outreach and inclusivity for diverse student groups.

Students from diverse backgrounds, including first-generation college attendees, expressed a particular need for enhanced mentorship and support in navigating these challenges.

DEFINE

The discovery phase led to a refined understanding of the problem. 

How might we help undergraduate students gain knowledge and mentorship about research in a way that decreases anxiety, increases confidence, and better prepares them for future academic and professional aspirations?

  • Who: Undergraduate students
    • • Encompasses the individuals that we have identified as the various stakeholders
  • What: Gain knowledge and mentorship about research
    • Undergraduate students expressed specific aspects that they wanted to gain regarding research
    • More specific and expands upon the original need of “better understand research”
  • Why:
    • Driver: Better prepares them for future academic and professional aspirations
    • Driver: Increases confidence
    • Stakeholders expressed a fear of rejection and a fear of not being knowledgeable enough
  • How: Feeling of anxiety
    • Stakeholders expressed their feelings of anxiety and stress regarding the application process

The team pinpointed the critical need for a supportive structure that facilitates access to research opportunities and cultivates a sense of belonging and value among undergraduates. They underscored the importance of mentorship, approachable networking, and confidence-building measures as essential components of this supportive ecosystem.

Complexity and Accessibility of Research:

  • There’s a consensus on the need to simplify and demystify research processes.
  • Staff focus on methodical instruction, while students seek more relatable and less intimidating access to research.

Emotional and Educational Response to Research:

  • Reducing anxiety is pivotal for both groups.
  • Staff may emphasize structured support, whereas students prefer a more nurturing and empathetic approach.

Engagement and Application in Learning:

  • Enhancing interest through real-world relevance and interactive learning is crucial.
  • Staff often view this through an academic lens, while students look for engaging, practical experiences that connect to their future careers.
Summary and Key Takeaways

The project illuminated the profound impact of research experiences on undergraduate students’ academic and professional trajectories. Key takeaways highlighted the essential role of simplifying the research process, addressing emotional barriers, and linking academic inquiry to real-world applications. Moreover, the findings emphasized the need for mentorship and a supportive community to enhance student confidence and preparedness for future challenges.

Most Significant Takeaways:

  • Students have a desire to gain research experience due to a desire to shape their future academic and professional paths
  • Students experience feelings of stress and anxiety about seeking out research
  • Students have a desire for mentorship

Important Ideas to Move Forward with SPUR:

  • Use methods that provide students with research readiness and
  • research opportunities
  • Focus on reducing feelings of anxiousness in students
  • Utilize UREs to provide mentorship and valuable experience for
  • students

In conclusion, by adopting a holistic and empathetic approach to understanding and addressing undergraduates’ challenges in engaging with research, the team laid the groundwork for transformative changes. These efforts promise to improve the quality of undergraduate research experiences and inspire a new generation of scholars equipped to navigate the complexities of the academic and professional worlds.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further the understanding of a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Katie Lin, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )
  • Evelyn Chen, Student, Speculative Design / Marketing
  • Siya Randhawa, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )
  • Neda Emdad, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )/ Junior Designer Program
Team 4 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

SPUR TEAM 4

In an era where undergraduate research experience is increasingly recognized as pivotal for academic and professional success, a team embarked on a comprehensive project to devise strategies that could enhance this journey for students. Their initiative addressed undergraduates’ core challenges in accessing and engaging with research opportunities, aiming to demystify the research process, reduce associated anxieties, and foster a more profound interest in scholarly inquiry.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

Initially, the team articulated the problem: “How might we help undergraduate students better understand research in a way that decreases anxiety, increases interest, and improves research readiness?” This statement underscored the multifaceted barriers students encounter, from the complexity of research to emotional responses and the need for practical engagement.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Through empathy maps, stakeholder mappings, and observations, the team identified key issues affecting undergraduates, including the daunting nature of the research environment, limited accessibility to meaningful opportunities, and the prevalent sense of being overwhelmed and undervalued. 

  • Undergraduate Students: Diverse challenges in accessing research opportunities due to varied backgrounds (STEM, Non-STEM, First-Gen, etc.). Need awareness and resources tailored to their specific needs.
  • Graduate Students: Similar to undergraduates but with a focus on research for career advancement. Act as potential mentors for undergrads.
  • Faculty & Staff: Critical in guiding and informing students about research opportunities, providing mentorship and support across different disciplines.
  • Administrators (Chancellors, Deans, etc.): Strategic role in resource allocation and policy-making to enhance research accessibility.
  • Researchers & Employers (Academic, Corporate, etc.): Offer direct research opportunities but may need to improve outreach and inclusivity for diverse student groups.

Students from diverse backgrounds, including first-generation college attendees, expressed a particular need for enhanced mentorship and support in navigating these challenges.

DEFINE

The discovery phase led to a refined understanding of the problem. 

How might we help undergraduate students gain knowledge and mentorship about research in a way that decreases anxiety, increases confidence, and better prepares them for future academic and professional aspirations?

  • Who: Undergraduate students
    • • Encompasses the individuals that we have identified as the various stakeholders
  • What: Gain knowledge and mentorship about research
    • Undergraduate students expressed specific aspects that they wanted to gain regarding research
    • More specific and expands upon the original need of “better understand research”
  • Why:
    • Driver: Better prepares them for future academic and professional aspirations
    • Driver: Increases confidence
    • Stakeholders expressed a fear of rejection and a fear of not being knowledgeable enough
  • How: Feeling of anxiety
    • Stakeholders expressed their feelings of anxiety and stress regarding the application process

The team pinpointed the critical need for a supportive structure that facilitates access to research opportunities and cultivates a sense of belonging and value among undergraduates. They underscored the importance of mentorship, approachable networking, and confidence-building measures as essential components of this supportive ecosystem.

Complexity and Accessibility of Research:

  • There’s a consensus on the need to simplify and demystify research processes.
  • Staff focus on methodical instruction, while students seek more relatable and less intimidating access to research.

Emotional and Educational Response to Research:

  • Reducing anxiety is pivotal for both groups.
  • Staff may emphasize structured support, whereas students prefer a more nurturing and empathetic approach.

Engagement and Application in Learning:

  • Enhancing interest through real-world relevance and interactive learning is crucial.
  • Staff often view this through an academic lens, while students look for engaging, practical experiences that connect to their future careers.
Summary and Key Takeaways

The project illuminated the profound impact of research experiences on undergraduate students’ academic and professional trajectories. Key takeaways highlighted the essential role of simplifying the research process, addressing emotional barriers, and linking academic inquiry to real-world applications. Moreover, the findings emphasized the need for mentorship and a supportive community to enhance student confidence and preparedness for future challenges.

Most Significant Takeaways:

  • Students have a desire to gain research experience due to a desire to shape their future academic and professional paths
  • Students experience feelings of stress and anxiety about seeking out research
  • Students have a desire for mentorship

Important Ideas to Move Forward with SPUR:

  • Use methods that provide students with research readiness and
  • research opportunities
  • Focus on reducing feelings of anxiousness in students
  • Utilize UREs to provide mentorship and valuable experience for
  • students

In conclusion, by adopting a holistic and empathetic approach to understanding and addressing undergraduates’ challenges in engaging with research, the team laid the groundwork for transformative changes. These efforts promise to improve the quality of undergraduate research experiences and inspire a new generation of scholars equipped to navigate the complexities of the academic and professional worlds.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further the understanding of a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Katie Lin, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )
  • Evelyn Chen, Student, Speculative Design / Marketing
  • Siya Randhawa, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )
  • Neda Emdad, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )/ Junior Designer Program
Team 4 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

SPUR TEAM 4

In an era where undergraduate research experience is increasingly recognized as pivotal for academic and professional success, a team embarked on a comprehensive project to devise strategies that could enhance this journey for students. Their initiative addressed undergraduates’ core challenges in accessing and engaging with research opportunities, aiming to demystify the research process, reduce associated anxieties, and foster a more profound interest in scholarly inquiry.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

Initially, the team articulated the problem: “How might we help undergraduate students better understand research in a way that decreases anxiety, increases interest, and improves research readiness?” This statement underscored the multifaceted barriers students encounter, from the complexity of research to emotional responses and the need for practical engagement.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Through empathy maps, stakeholder mappings, and observations, the team identified key issues affecting undergraduates, including the daunting nature of the research environment, limited accessibility to meaningful opportunities, and the prevalent sense of being overwhelmed and undervalued. 

  • Undergraduate Students: Diverse challenges in accessing research opportunities due to varied backgrounds (STEM, Non-STEM, First-Gen, etc.). Need awareness and resources tailored to their specific needs.
  • Graduate Students: Similar to undergraduates but with a focus on research for career advancement. Act as potential mentors for undergrads.
  • Faculty & Staff: Critical in guiding and informing students about research opportunities, providing mentorship and support across different disciplines.
  • Administrators (Chancellors, Deans, etc.): Strategic role in resource allocation and policy-making to enhance research accessibility.
  • Researchers & Employers (Academic, Corporate, etc.): Offer direct research opportunities but may need to improve outreach and inclusivity for diverse student groups.

Students from diverse backgrounds, including first-generation college attendees, expressed a particular need for enhanced mentorship and support in navigating these challenges.

DEFINE

The discovery phase led to a refined understanding of the problem. 

How might we help undergraduate students gain knowledge and mentorship about research in a way that decreases anxiety, increases confidence, and better prepares them for future academic and professional aspirations?

  • Who: Undergraduate students
    • • Encompasses the individuals that we have identified as the various stakeholders
  • What: Gain knowledge and mentorship about research
    • Undergraduate students expressed specific aspects that they wanted to gain regarding research
    • More specific and expands upon the original need of “better understand research”
  • Why:
    • Driver: Better prepares them for future academic and professional aspirations
    • Driver: Increases confidence
    • Stakeholders expressed a fear of rejection and a fear of not being knowledgeable enough
  • How: Feeling of anxiety
    • Stakeholders expressed their feelings of anxiety and stress regarding the application process

The team pinpointed the critical need for a supportive structure that facilitates access to research opportunities and cultivates a sense of belonging and value among undergraduates. They underscored the importance of mentorship, approachable networking, and confidence-building measures as essential components of this supportive ecosystem.

Complexity and Accessibility of Research:

  • There’s a consensus on the need to simplify and demystify research processes.
  • Staff focus on methodical instruction, while students seek more relatable and less intimidating access to research.

Emotional and Educational Response to Research:

  • Reducing anxiety is pivotal for both groups.
  • Staff may emphasize structured support, whereas students prefer a more nurturing and empathetic approach.

Engagement and Application in Learning:

  • Enhancing interest through real-world relevance and interactive learning is crucial.
  • Staff often view this through an academic lens, while students look for engaging, practical experiences that connect to their future careers.
Summary and Key Takeaways

The project illuminated the profound impact of research experiences on undergraduate students’ academic and professional trajectories. Key takeaways highlighted the essential role of simplifying the research process, addressing emotional barriers, and linking academic inquiry to real-world applications. Moreover, the findings emphasized the need for mentorship and a supportive community to enhance student confidence and preparedness for future challenges.

Most Significant Takeaways:

  • Students have a desire to gain research experience due to a desire to shape their future academic and professional paths
  • Students experience feelings of stress and anxiety about seeking out research
  • Students have a desire for mentorship

Important Ideas to Move Forward with SPUR:

  • Use methods that provide students with research readiness and
  • research opportunities
  • Focus on reducing feelings of anxiousness in students
  • Utilize UREs to provide mentorship and valuable experience for
  • students

In conclusion, by adopting a holistic and empathetic approach to understanding and addressing undergraduates’ challenges in engaging with research, the team laid the groundwork for transformative changes. These efforts promise to improve the quality of undergraduate research experiences and inspire a new generation of scholars equipped to navigate the complexities of the academic and professional worlds.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further the understanding of a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Katie Lin, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )
  • Evelyn Chen, Student, Speculative Design / Marketing
  • Siya Randhawa, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )
  • Neda Emdad, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )/ Junior Designer Program
Team 4 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

Read Next

Design Lab Don Norman Healthcare Designforward

San Diego is Getting Serious About Healthcare Design

In June 2017, San Diego hosted two of the largest annual healthcare conventions - the…

How I Talked To My Daughter About Body Image

How I talked to my daughter-and myself-about body image

Design Lab member Shannon Master recently had her article published in TIME magazine's special edition on weight loss! Her work can be found on shelves across the nation from April 12 - July 12.

Below is an excerpt from Shannon's essay Does this mean I'm a real writer? where she discusses the article for TIME magazine.

"How I talked to my daughter-and myself-about body image...tackles important social issues surrounding body-image for young girls, their mothers, and women at large. It offers research on how mothers can not only help stop the cycle of negative body image in their young daughters, but also how moms as women themselves can work to improve their own body-image. I was surprised that the editors changed very little, except for the title, which is amazing considering this thing magically ejected itself out of me in a matter of days, rather than the weeks and months I can work on something that never sees the light of day. It looks pretty spiffy in its new home, complete with updated statistics and accompanying photos across an eight-page spread; eight pages of my words about how we can reframe our own body images as mothers, in order to help our girls have everything we never had—confidence and self-esteem with an unwavering sense of worth—in a frickn’ national publication."

Read more at shannonmaster.com

UCSD Design Lab & the National Cancer Institute organize workshop on Human Systems Integration

On October 20 and 21, the Design Lab jointly organized a workshop with the National…

Frontier Design Prize Announces Winners at World Design Cities Conference

Shanghai, September 15, 2022 | The Frontier Design Prize announced the winners of its inaugural edition during the opening ceremony of the World Design Cities Conference (WDCC).  Mr. QU Xing, Deputy Director-General of UNESCO, Mr. GONG Zheng, Mayor of Shanghai, Ms. XU Xiaolan, Vice Minister of Industry and Information Technology (China), along with leading designers, scholars and industry leaders, attended the award ceremony. The Frontier Design Prize (FDP) is a visionary, innovative, world-class design award established with the aims of encouraging design innovation, enhancing the impact of design in driving industrial transformation, and promoting the role of design in shaping a better world. A central program of WDCC, it is undertaken by Design Innovation Institute Shanghai (DIIS) with guidance from the Shanghai Municipal Government. 

Derek Lomas and Philip Guo Recognized by Premier International HCI Conference

UC San Diego Design Lab members Derek Lomas and Philip Guo were recently recognized by…

Design Education Don Norman

The Future of Design Education

Don Norman, Design Lab Director, reports on "The Future of Design Education"

Many of you know that for a long time I have been partnering with IBM Design and The World Design Organization to rethink the curriculum for design.  This is a progress report.

The History

It all started in March 2014 when Scott Klemmer and I wrote a paper called "State of Design: How Design Education Must Change" published in LinkedIn. (Why LinkedIn? Because of the wide, diverse readership: This paper has been read by 50,167 people, with 93 comments.) https://bit.ly/31Qqv1W

Design Lab

When Scott, Jim Hollan, and I started the Design Lab, we knew what we did NOT wish to do: build a traditional design education. Our training was rich and varied, and we wanted our students to have a similarly broad education. We wanted to do things that made a real difference in the world. After all, our origin was from Cognitive Science and computers -- Human Behavior and Technology, Design is an applied field that requires multi-disciplinary approaches to important, difficult issues.
Back To Top