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SPUR Team 11

SPUR Team 11

SPUR Team 11

SPUR TEAM 11

The project report addresses the critical need to assist undergraduate students, faculty, and staff in obtaining paid research opportunities to enhance their experience and readiness for research.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

How might we help undergraduate students, faculty, and staff get paid for research opportunities to increase opportunities, expand their experience, and improve research readiness.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

It identifies widespread funding shortfalls, the necessity for fair student compensation, funding needs for staff, challenges posed by a competitive job market, and the impact of limited financial support on the diversity of applicant pools. Special attention is given to the challenges faced by ethnically diverse students, first-generation students, STEM and non-STEM students, and students of varied gender identities and sexual orientations, highlighting the unique difficulties each group faces in accessing research opportunities.

DEFINE

Key insights include the importance of funding to enable meaningful research opportunities and the critical role of student engagement in increasing awareness and ease of application for research positions. The report evolves from focusing on generating revenue to a broader consideration of effectively accessing and utilizing available resources to improve research opportunities and readiness.

Updated Problem Statement

How can we create a robust system that enables students, faculty, and staff to seamlessly apply for and access funding dedicated to research opportunities, fostering growth in the number of available opportunities, enhancing experiential learning, and ultimately improving the research readiness of the academic community

DEVELOP

The action phase emphasizes the need to create accessible funding channels, enhance the research program experience, and leverage resources to improve research readiness. Moving forward, the project prioritizes the development of effective funding mechanisms, boosting engagement and accessibility, and adopting an integrated approach to maximize the impact of the initiatives.

Summary and Key Takeaways

In summary, the report advocates for a robust system that facilitates access to dedicated research funding, aiming to expand the number of opportunities available, enrich experiential learning, and ultimately enhance the research readiness of the academic community.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further understand a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Michael Sailor, Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • Vaibhav Bommisetty, Student, Data Science
  • Ethan Han, Student, Computer Science
  • Mark Morera, Student, Cognitive Science
  • Harris Dalal, Business/Economics, Junior Designer Program
Team 11 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

SPUR TEAM 11

The project report addresses the critical need to assist undergraduate students, faculty, and staff in obtaining paid research opportunities to enhance their experience and readiness for research.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

How might we help undergraduate students, faculty, and staff get paid for research opportunities to increase opportunities, expand their experience, and improve research readiness.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

It identifies widespread funding shortfalls, the necessity for fair student compensation, funding needs for staff, challenges posed by a competitive job market, and the impact of limited financial support on the diversity of applicant pools. Special attention is given to the challenges faced by ethnically diverse students, first-generation students, STEM and non-STEM students, and students of varied gender identities and sexual orientations, highlighting the unique difficulties each group faces in accessing research opportunities.

DEFINE

Key insights include the importance of funding to enable meaningful research opportunities and the critical role of student engagement in increasing awareness and ease of application for research positions. The report evolves from focusing on generating revenue to a broader consideration of effectively accessing and utilizing available resources to improve research opportunities and readiness.

Updated Problem Statement

How can we create a robust system that enables students, faculty, and staff to seamlessly apply for and access funding dedicated to research opportunities, fostering growth in the number of available opportunities, enhancing experiential learning, and ultimately improving the research readiness of the academic community

DEVELOP

The action phase emphasizes the need to create accessible funding channels, enhance the research program experience, and leverage resources to improve research readiness. Moving forward, the project prioritizes the development of effective funding mechanisms, boosting engagement and accessibility, and adopting an integrated approach to maximize the impact of the initiatives.

Summary and Key Takeaways

In summary, the report advocates for a robust system that facilitates access to dedicated research funding, aiming to expand the number of opportunities available, enrich experiential learning, and ultimately enhance the research readiness of the academic community.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further understand a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Michael Sailor, Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • Vaibhav Bommisetty, Student, Data Science
  • Ethan Han, Student, Computer Science
  • Mark Morera, Student, Cognitive Science
  • Harris Dalal, Business/Economics, Junior Designer Program
Team 11 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

SPUR TEAM 11

The project report addresses the critical need to assist undergraduate students, faculty, and staff in obtaining paid research opportunities to enhance their experience and readiness for research.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

How might we help undergraduate students, faculty, and staff get paid for research opportunities to increase opportunities, expand their experience, and improve research readiness.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

It identifies widespread funding shortfalls, the necessity for fair student compensation, funding needs for staff, challenges posed by a competitive job market, and the impact of limited financial support on the diversity of applicant pools. Special attention is given to the challenges faced by ethnically diverse students, first-generation students, STEM and non-STEM students, and students of varied gender identities and sexual orientations, highlighting the unique difficulties each group faces in accessing research opportunities.

DEFINE

Key insights include the importance of funding to enable meaningful research opportunities and the critical role of student engagement in increasing awareness and ease of application for research positions. The report evolves from focusing on generating revenue to a broader consideration of effectively accessing and utilizing available resources to improve research opportunities and readiness.

Updated Problem Statement

How can we create a robust system that enables students, faculty, and staff to seamlessly apply for and access funding dedicated to research opportunities, fostering growth in the number of available opportunities, enhancing experiential learning, and ultimately improving the research readiness of the academic community

DEVELOP

The action phase emphasizes the need to create accessible funding channels, enhance the research program experience, and leverage resources to improve research readiness. Moving forward, the project prioritizes the development of effective funding mechanisms, boosting engagement and accessibility, and adopting an integrated approach to maximize the impact of the initiatives.

Summary and Key Takeaways

In summary, the report advocates for a robust system that facilitates access to dedicated research funding, aiming to expand the number of opportunities available, enrich experiential learning, and ultimately enhance the research readiness of the academic community.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further understand a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Michael Sailor, Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • Vaibhav Bommisetty, Student, Data Science
  • Ethan Han, Student, Computer Science
  • Mark Morera, Student, Cognitive Science
  • Harris Dalal, Business/Economics, Junior Designer Program
Team 11 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

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